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Mutsumi Hinoura Shirogami Kurouchi – Chef’s Knife 21cm – The Gyuto
Mutsumi Hinoura Shirogami Kurouchi – Chef’s Knife 21cm – The Gyuto
Mutsumi Hinoura Gyuto 210mm Shirogami Nashiji Kurouchi Custom Japanese Knife
Mutsumi Hinoura Gyuto 210mm Shirogami Kurouchi Custom Japanese Knife
mutsumi hinoura handle
mutsumi hinoura gyuto detail kurouchi blue japanese knife floating
mutsumi hinoura gyuto detail kurouchi blade tip

Mutsumi Hinoura Shirogami Kurouchi - Chef's Knife 21cm Gyuto

(3 customer reviews)

£370

This Mutsumi Hinoura Gyuto with Shirogami #2 steel core and stainless cladding with Kurouchi finish is highly recommended for busy cooks and equally great as a home knife. It is a must have kitchen knife, adored for its versatility and sharpness.

– Blade set in beautiful stabilised premium-cut maple wood in octagonal shape
– Very responsive to sharpening stones

Product Description

The Mutshumi Hinoura Gyuto

Like all Gyuto knives, this Mutsumi Hinoura Gyuto was originally designed for cutting larger pieces of beef, which is where its name came from – it literally means “a cow sword”. Now, the Gyuto is a must have knife in the kitchen due to its versatility – it can easily cut meat, vegetables and fruit.

The knife can be used for almost every task in the kitchen. It cuts tofu, chops squashes, dices tomatoes, and slices steaks. The Mutsumi Hinoura Gyuto will make food prep more enjoyable and easier, it is truly a multipurpose knife for everyday use.

The blade

The blade is made from shirogami with a carbon content between 1.05% and 1.15%, also known as White Steel #2. This is a very pure carbon steel, very popular among high end Japanese knives. The shirogami blade has a very good edge holding and very high working hardness. This means you can grind it to exceptional sharpness, which retains it for a long time. This steel is particularly suitable for the gentle preparation of foods but due to its high carbon content, it is prone to oxidation, which means your knife will rust if not taken care of (e.g. if left wet for longer).

The blade’s Kurochi finish is a traditional and rustic Japanese blacksmithing finish where the knife keeps the black scaly residue from the forging process. It gives the blade a rustic charm and character. This also means that no two blades’ patterns will ever be the same, making each Kurochi finish one of a kind.

The handle

The Mutsumi Hinoura Gyuto’s beautiful handles are made with extremely limited European maple burl dyed in a green and blue colour. The wood is dried for two years before it undergoes the process of stabilisation and colour dying. This ensures the wood is completely waterproof to avoid bacteria growth and is able to last generations.

The stabilised premium-cut maple burl is cut into the octagonal shaped ambidextrous handle, giving you a firm grip on the knife. Not only are the handles aesthetically pleasing, they are also light. This allows for maximum precision and more controlled movements during use.

Please note that no two handle colours or patterns are ever the same as the natural properties of each wood block are unique and will absorb the colour dye differently. This will give each knife a beautiful unique look.

 

The blacksmith

The Hinoura family is a well-known Japanese family of blacksmiths that have been making knives for over 120 years. After years of handcrafting knives, they have developed unique skills and knowledge, which have been passed from generation to generation.

Mutsumi Hinoura has been training and working with his father, master smith Tsukasa Hinoura, since 2001, in Sanjo. Hinoura’s unique bladesmithing techniques allow producing knives that will keep fine edges longer than any other knife on the market. His knives have good distal tapers and wide kiriba style bevels, and really wonderful heat treatments. He has a lot of experience with hunting and outdoor knives, and their kitchen knives carry some of the same qualities of toughness.

Maintenance

Shirogami #2 is very responsive to sharpening stones, taking an extremely fine, biting edge easily. As shirogami and iron are both reactive, keep these dry when not in use to avoid rust. Please remember that the core is not stainless and should be dried after use (check our maintenance tips here). The blade will develop a dark patina with normal use, but any orange rust should be removed with a light abrasive or sharpening.

Like most equipment, knives need a little love and care. You need to sharpen them regularly and depending on the type of steel, dry them immediately after use. These are 3 general rules you should follow:

  1. Don’t put your knife in a dishwasher.
  2. Store your knives either on the magnetic knife strip, knife stand, or sheathed in the utensil drawer.
  3. Don’t slide your knife, blade down, across the cutting board to clear away what you just chopped.

 

The Spec

Weight0.3 kg
Dimensions35 × 5 × 3 cm
Maker

Mutsumi Hinoura

HRC

Steel Type

Knife Handle Material

Blade Length

Knife Type

Handle Waterproof

Yes

Good to know

Do these knives require special care?

Our knives are extremely durable and easy to care for. However, any knife, even a premium one needs sharpening at some point. As a good habit, you should sharpen them regularly and dry them immediately after use. These are 3 general rules you should follow:

  1. Don’t put your knife in a dishwasher.
  2. Store your knives either on the magnetic knife strip, knife stand, or sheathed in the utensil drawer.
  3. Don’t slide your knife, blade down, across the cutting board to clear away what you just chopped.

Also, check our full guide on how to properly maintain the knife and sharpen it.

 
 

How long will my knife stay sharp?

This really depends on how often you use the knife, how you care for it and what items you’re cutting. In general, Japanese knives tend to hold their edge longer than Western knives. In other words, Japanese knives stay sharper longer than their Western counterparts. When tested, Sakai Kyuba knives outperformed brands that cost much more. We estimate that for a person cooking 5 times a week, Sakai Kyuba knives will stay sharp for around 4-8 months. However, no knife — including ours — will stay sharp forever. Which is why we provide a variety of sharpening stones, so when the blade starts to dull, you can sharpen it easily at your home in 5-10 minutes. Otherwise, check out our recommended trusted knife sharpening services.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Santoku knives are larger, multi-purpose knives. They’re usually shorter than long chef knives (less than 21cm) and have wide, flat blades and fairly blunt or slightly rounded tips. As a result, they’re not very well suited for piercing.

With no belly (or curve) to the blade, you can’t rock with them either. On the other hand, the long, straight blade of a Santoku is particularly useful for long cutting strokes. The wide blade helps for transferring food, too. These qualities make Santokus especially good for chopping. Like other Japanese knives, Santokus tend to be thin, hard, and very sharp. Some Santokus feature an asymmetric grind, meaning that they can only be used in either your right or left hand. Others have a hollow grind for extra sharpness.

There are two big differences between a Santoku and a chef’s knife. First, Santokus have fairly flat tips. This means it’s harder to start a cut or slice by stabbing with the tip of the knife. Second, Santokus have no curve or belly. As a result, knife techniques that involve rocking the blade back and forth are pretty much out of the question.

With so many shapes, sizes, steels, finishes and handle materials it can be overwhelming knowing what to look for in a Japanese knife. But choosing a kitchen knife and right sharpening tools is not as hard you might think, it just seems like it because of all the choices available. We are here for you to select the best Japanese knife. The cost and the fear of getting it wrong can be stressful but since we offer 50 day money back guarantee, we are 100% sure you will love our products. We’re here to help you figure it all out and get you your new favourite knife (or a set of them :). Check our Guide to Buying your First Japanese Knife or the “Japanese knives” section on our Journal.

You need to sharpen them regularly and depending on the type of steel, dry them immediately after use. These are 3 general rules you should follow:

  1. Don’t put your knife in a dishwasher, ever.
  2. Store your knives either on the magnetic knife strip knife stand, or sheathed in the utensil drawer.
  3. Don’t slide your knife, blade down, across the cutting board to clear away what you just chopped.

Also, check our full guide how to properly maintain the knife and sharpen it. Otherwise have a look at the “Equipment care” section of our Journal. 

It depends on the steel you’ll go for. Like most equipment, knives need a little love and care. Here are a few tips to help you get lasting service from your knife:

  • Keep your knife dry – the entire knife, not just the blade.
  • Keep your knife sharp. Remember, a sharp blade is safer than a dull one. Use only professional sharpening tools and whetstones.
  • Do not use the cutting blade as a can opener, chisel, pry bar, screwdriver or for any heavy work for which your knife was not designed. Also, don’t use the back of your knife as a hammer. It may break the springs, handles or pin.
  • Handles made of wood can be occasionally rubbed with furniture polish or oil. Brass can be polished with household brass polish.
  • Avoid prolonged immersion in liquids (water, solvents, etc.). This can have a detrimental effect on not only the metal parts, but handles made of wood or other porous materials as well. Before using your knife on food items, wipe clean with alcohol, or wash with hot soapy water and rinse clean. Remember to re-clean and lubricate your knife after the food job is done.
  • Periodically apply a small amount of lubricant to the working parts of the knife, particularly the pivot points of a folding knife. Then apply a thin film of lubricant to the entire surface of the blade. This will help prevent surface oxidation and corrosion from moisture.
  • Sharpen your knives using high-quality sharpening tools such as natural stones or whetstones. 
  •  

For more knowledge read our articles:

Damascus, Wootz, and patternweld are all names given to different types of steels and blades. Basically, the idea is that two or more steel alloys are forged/cast together through various methods to give the wavy artistic pattern that comes from such a layering process. Historically, true Damascus steel was only made in the city of Damascus. For centuries, the blades made there were prized for their beautiful water-like patterning as much as for their sharpness. The Damascus production method, understandably, was a closely guarded trade secret. Special blade-folding techniques and unique impurities in the steel both contributed to its success. In the end, however, the secret was kept too well. Since the Damascus blade-making industry died out in the 18th century, nobody has managed to recreate it accurately on a commercial scale.

Today, ‘Damascus steel’ chef’s knives contain different grades of steel folded together repeatedly, sometimes around a core of pure knife-grade steel. The aim is to imitate the technique and appearance of historical Damascus steel, if not its exact composition.

A properly made Japanese Damascus chef’s knife will always exhibit great durability and sharpness. However, the main attraction is the distinctive patterning created by the layers of metal.

Whether Japanese, Swiss or German, each type of knife has been influenced by its culture. The Japanese believe in need of having a perfect tool for an explicit purpose, and as such have many specific knife shapes for specific tasks. Meanwhile, Germans value versatility and durability in their culinary efforts and therefore German knives are characterised by being good in many different undertakings. In the end, each knife has its own strengths and weaknesses. It’s not that one style of knife is better than the other — it’s just a matter of use and preference (of course as long as the knife is made from high-quality materials).

For more in-depth information read our article What’s the Difference Between German and Japanese Knives?

If you’re just the beginner or an occasional user (We are guilty as charged! We usually leave this job to our partners), we suggest getting a combination whetstone, something between 1000 and 6000 grit like King 1000/6000 combo waterstone. These two stones and an inexpensive flattener will carry you a very long way. Add other stones or stropping supplies in the future as you learn. We think most new sharpeners should stay away from stones coarser than #1000 until they develop a technique they are comfortable with unless there is a very specific project in mind.

For more information read our article Which waterstone grit should you choose?

Learn more from our journal

Customers opinions

Reviewed by 02 customer(s)

  • Alfred Alfredo

    Fantastic

    January 14, 2022
  • Zane

    Good quality.

    December 14, 2021
    Verified Purchase
  • Edward

    Love it!

    August 20, 2019
    Verified Purchase

Show only reviews in English (3)

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