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moritaka sujihiki 210mm as japanese kitchen knife
moritaka sujihiki 210mm as japanese kitchen knife
Moritaka Gyuto 210mm AS featuring our signature magnetic knife stand in oak
Moritaka Aogami #2 Sujihiki Yanagiba 210mm Japanese Kitchen Knife

Moritaka AS - Fish Meat Japanese Kitchen Knife 21cm - Yanagiba

(2 customer reviews)

$214

Part of Moritaka’s supreme series of kitchen knives, this 210mm Yanagiba features a long blade that is perfect for cutting through a piece of meat or fish in one go. An ideal knife for slicing boneless fish fillets for sashimi and sushi dishes, or skinning fish.

– The kurouchi finish provides a brilliant rustic aesthetic to the blade and also aids in corrosion resistance
– The blue steel blade is forged to a stainless steel tang, which is then inserted into a beautiful cherrywood handle

Product Description

About the yanagiba

The Moritaka AS Yanagiba knife slicer can carve and fabricate large roasts and other meats and fish, and can be used for thinly slicing other ingredients such as cucumbers or smoked salmon. Yanagiba’s long blade allows the meat or fish to be cut in one single drawing motion, from heel to tip. The narrow blade and relatively acute edge angle of the yanagiba are features which greatly reduce the effort required to cut through ingredients. For this reason, it is best to use a blade which is as long your budget and workspace will allow. The combination of cutting technique, acute blade angle, and sharp edge result in very little cellular damage in the cut surface. This is particularly important for dishes where the fish is eaten raw, because it helps to preserve the original flavour and texture of the fish.

The edge of this knife is more durable than its single bevel counterparts and can be used in more applications than simply breaking down a whole fish. This is also a tremendous knife for left-handed users who are looking to explore the pattern but don’t want to pay large sums of money to have a custom left-handed knife produced by a blacksmith. Fit and finish is excellent on these knives, and given the amount of metal that is used to produce those Yanagibas, this is one of the best values to be found in handcrafted Aogami Super steel.

Timeless

Aogami Super Steel along with Aogami #2 are selected because of their extra durability and longer edge retention. The super durable handle is made out of seasoned Cherrywood. The Cherrywood will outlast lighter magnolia wood usually used on Japanese knives.

The important thing about Moritaka knives (and this Moritaka AS yanagiba knife) is the fact that the carbon blade is forged to a stainless tang, which means that any moisture will not result in premature pitting or damage to the handle. So, no rusting from the inside causing the handle to come loose (a problem with traditional Japanese knives). This new design and patented solution ensure both longevity and hygiene of the knives.

Aogami Super Steel is the highest YSS (Yasugi Speciality Steel) that contains high percentages of carbon, chrome and tungsten to increase hardness, improving edge retention and corrosion resistance. Aogami Super Steel is prized for its ability to take a very steep, sharp edge.

Craftsmanship 

Moritaka Hamono is a traditional knife making company that has a history of over 700 years. During years of handcrafting knives, they have developed unique skills and knowledge, which have been passed from generation to generation. Moritaka’s unique bladesmithing techniques allow producing knives that will keep fine edges longer than any other knife on the market. Both the performance and character of these blades can be felt upon first use of this knife.

moritaka hamono family

Today, your knives are being forged by the 26th, 27th, and 28th swordsmith.

      • Takuzo Moritaka (the master and 26th swordsmith) is still there but about to retire, while his two sons:
      • Tsunehiro Moritaka (27th swordsmith) and
      • his younger brother Teruhiro Moritaka (28th swordsmith) continue on the family tradition.

There is no assembly line at this factory – just artists at work.  And we have imported these knives directly from the Moritaka family. Please note, that each knife has slightly different appearance and size because the blade is hand-crafted and the handle is natural wood.

Maintenance

The edges on Moritaka AS Yanagiba knife this knife are extremely steep and can be taken through high levels of refinement on the stones. Given the intended purpose, it may be worth keeping the maker’s bevel angle in place to avoid chipping when working through poultry joints. The finish is kurouchi (black) with a lacquer coating — this helps protect the steel and should not be polished off. The edge, unlike traditional single-bevel Japanese knives, is a 50-50 double-edge making it much easier to keep sharp using some commonly available sharpening systems.

Like most equipment, this Moritaka AS Yanagiba knife needs a little love and care. You need to sharpen them regularly and depending on the type of steel, dry them immediately after use. These are 3 general rules you should follow:

      1. Don’t put your knife in a dishwasher.
      2. Store your knives either on the magnetic knife stripknife stand, or sheathed in the utensil drawer.
      3. Don’t slide your knife, blade down, across the cutting board to clear away what you just chopped.

Also, check our full guide on how to properly maintain the knife and sharpen it.

The Spec

Weight0.4 kg
Dimensions35 × 5 × 3 cm
HRC

Steel Type

Knife Handle Material

Blade Length

Knife Type

Handle Waterproof

Yes

Good to know

Do these knives require special care?

Our knives are extremely durable and easy to care for. However, any knife, even a premium one needs sharpening at some point. As a good habit, you should sharpen them regularly and dry them immediately after use. These are 3 general rules you should follow:

  1. Don’t put your knife in a dishwasher.
  2. Store your knives either on the magnetic knife strip, knife stand, or sheathed in the utensil drawer.
  3. Don’t slide your knife, blade down, across the cutting board to clear away what you just chopped.

Also, check our full guide on how to properly maintain the knife and sharpen it.

 
 

How long will my knife stay sharp?

This really depends on how often you use the knife, how you care for it and what items you’re cutting. In general, Japanese knives tend to hold their edge longer than Western knives. In other words, Japanese knives stay sharper longer than their Western counterparts. When tested, Sakai Kyuba knives outperformed brands that cost much more. We estimate that for a person cooking 5 times a week, Sakai Kyuba knives will stay sharp for around 4-8 months. However, no knife — including ours — will stay sharp forever. Which is why we provide a variety of sharpening stones, so when the blade starts to dull, you can sharpen it easily at your home in 5-10 minutes. Otherwise, check out our recommended trusted knife sharpening services.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Santoku knives are larger, multi-purpose knives. They’re usually shorter than long chef knives (less than 21cm) and have wide, flat blades and fairly blunt or slightly rounded tips. As a result, they’re not very well suited for piercing. With no belly (or curve) to the blade, you can’t rock with them either. On the other hand, the long, straight blade of a Santoku is particularly useful for long cutting strokes. The wide blade helps for transferring food, too. These qualities make Santokus especially good for chopping. Like other Japanese knives, Santokus tend to be thin, hard, and very sharp. Some Santokus feature an asymmetric grind, meaning that they can only be used in either your right or left hand. Others have a hollow grind for extra sharpness. There are two big differences between a Santoku and a chef’s knife. First, Santokus have fairly flat tips. This means it’s harder to start a cut or slice by stabbing with the tip of the knife. Second, Santokus have no curve or belly. As a result, knife techniques that involve rocking the blade back and forth are pretty much out of the question.

With so many shapes, sizes, steels, finishes and handle materials it can be overwhelming knowing what to look for in a Japanese knife. But choosing a kitchen knife and right sharpening tools is not as hard you might think, it just seems like it because of all the choices available. We are here for you to select the best Japanese knife. The cost and the fear of getting it wrong can be stressful but since we offer 50 day money back guarantee, we are 100% sure you will love our products. We’re here to help you figure it all out and get you your new favourite knife (or a set of them :). Check our Guide to Buying your First Japanese Knife or the “Japanese knives” section on our Journal.

You need to sharpen them regularly and depending on the type of steel, dry them immediately after use. These are 3 general rules you should follow:

  1. Don’t put your knife in a dishwasher, ever.
  2. Store your knives either on the magnetic knife strip knife stand, or sheathed in the utensil drawer.
  3. Don’t slide your knife, blade down, across the cutting board to clear away what you just chopped.

Also, check our full guide how to properly maintain the knife and sharpen it. Otherwise have a look at the “Equipment care” section of our Journal. 

It depends on the steel you’ll go for. Like most equipment, knives need a little love and care. Here are a few tips to help you get lasting service from your knife:

  • Keep your knife dry – the entire knife, not just the blade.
  • Keep your knife sharp. Remember, a sharp blade is safer than a dull one. Use only professional sharpening tools and whetstones.
  • Do not use the cutting blade as a can opener, chisel, pry bar, screwdriver or for any heavy work for which your knife was not designed. Also, don’t use the back of your knife as a hammer. It may break the springs, handles or pin.
  • Handles made of wood can be occasionally rubbed with furniture polish or oil. Brass can be polished with household brass polish.
  • Avoid prolonged immersion in liquids (water, solvents, etc.). This can have a detrimental effect on not only the metal parts, but handles made of wood or other porous materials as well. Before using your knife on food items, wipe clean with alcohol, or wash with hot soapy water and rinse clean. Remember to re-clean and lubricate your knife after the food job is done.
  • Periodically apply a small amount of lubricant to the working parts of the knife, particularly the pivot points of a folding knife. Then apply a thin film of lubricant to the entire surface of the blade. This will help prevent surface oxidation and corrosion from moisture.
  • Sharpen your knives using high-quality sharpening tools such as natural stones or whetstones. 
  •  

For more knowledge read our articles:

Damascus, Wootz, and patternweld are all names given to different types of steels and blades. Basically, the idea is that two or more steel alloys are forged/cast together through various methods to give the wavy artistic pattern that comes from such a layering process. Historically, true Damascus steel was only made in the city of Damascus. For centuries, the blades made there were prized for their beautiful water-like patterning as much as for their sharpness. The Damascus production method, understandably, was a closely guarded trade secret. Special blade-folding techniques and unique impurities in the steel both contributed to its success. In the end, however, the secret was kept too well. Since the Damascus blade-making industry died out in the 18th century, nobody has managed to recreate it accurately on a commercial scale.

Today, ‘Damascus steel’ chef’s knives contain different grades of steel folded together repeatedly, sometimes around a core of pure knife-grade steel. The aim is to imitate the technique and appearance of historical Damascus steel, if not its exact composition.

A properly made Japanese Damascus chef’s knife will always exhibit great durability and sharpness. However, the main attraction is the distinctive patterning created by the layers of metal.

Whether Japanese, Swiss or German, each type of knife has been influenced by its culture. The Japanese believe in need of having a perfect tool for an explicit purpose, and as such have many specific knife shapes for specific tasks. Meanwhile, Germans value versatility and durability in their culinary efforts and therefore German knives are characterised by being good in many different undertakings. In the end, each knife has its own strengths and weaknesses. It’s not that one style of knife is better than the other — it’s just a matter of use and preference (of course as long as the knife is made from high-quality materials).

For more in-depth information read our article What’s the Difference Between German and Japanese Knives?

If you’re just the beginner or an occasional user (We are guilty as charged! We usually leave this job to our partners), we suggest getting a combination whetstone, something between 1000 and 6000 grit like King 1000/6000 combo waterstone. These two stones and an inexpensive flattener will carry you a very long way. Add other stones or stropping supplies in the future as you learn. We think most new sharpeners should stay away from stones coarser than #1000 until they develop a technique they are comfortable with unless there is a very specific project in mind.

For more information read our article Which waterstone grit should you choose?

Learn more from our journal